Josh Gordon Looming Suspension: Clearing Up The Smoke

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By now you know Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon was caught speeding and that he was not in possession of marijuana. After hearing the details, my bullsh*t radar started beeping. Here’s why:

First, Gordon was probably going faster than 74 miles per hour. Being ticketed for going 74 in a 60 mph zone means the cop didn’t want to tag Gordon with going 15 mph over the speed limit.

The cop likely cut Gordon a break so higher fines and a possible license suspension wouldn’t be imposed. Gordon was previously ticketed twice for speeding, including one occasion when he was letting the wind blow through his ‘fro at 98 mph.

Then there’s the passenger. This guy already admitted that the marijuana was his. I’ve represented criminal defendants for about 10 years—Gordon’s friend would be among the 1%’ers who actually admit to being guilty.

The typical conversation in a vehicle between two guys being pulled over is like this:

Driver: “Here man, take this gun...I’m on probation.”

Passenger: “WTF?! Hell no! I’m on probation too.”

Now here’s how it probably went down in Gordon’s vehicle:

Gordon: “Man, take this weed...I’m already up for suspension.”

Friend: (holds hand up making $ sign with fingers)

Gordon: “Okay. I got you.”

Friend to Cop: “Hello, officer. I'm in possession of marijuana.”

And finally, let’s dispel the notion suggested by some that Gordon may test positive for marijuana because of second hand smoke. Marijuana is broken down into metabolites that pass through urine. And in order to have the metabolite in his system, Gordon has to actually smoke the marijuana. Unless, of course, he was sitting in a car for about a month with someone who was puffin' the ganga, then he might test positive—but I still doubt it. 

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One thing is clear, however, Josh Gordon loves to smoke marijuana. This dude was so high once in college, he actually fell asleep in a Taco Bell. True story.

He was suspended during his sophomore year at Baylor because of testing positive for marijuana, transferred to Utah (didn't play) and then entered the NFL Supplemental Draft. He was suspended the first two games of last season for testing positive for marijuana and now will likely sit out the entire 2014 season.

In other words, Gordon isn’t a football player who got caught being a pothead; he’s a pothead who got caught playing football.

Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins Bio

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).

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Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).