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Fantasy Football: How To Keep Out-Of-Contention Owners Engaged

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I just saw these tweets by @RumfordJohnny:

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I was going to reply with a way to prevent managers from becoming “a door mat” but 140 characters (280 if I’m bold) didn’t suffice. Thus, you get this. 

I’m the commissioner for a fantasy football league that has been running strong since 1997. Married...with Children, Martin and Beavis and Butt-head were still on the air when we started the league. It was a time when you secretly like the new hit song, MMMBop by Hanson. Yes, you did.

Since that time, one of the more frustrating aspects of fantasy football is exactly what Rummy tweeted: when managers abandon their teams because they are out of contention for the playoffs.

And right around this time of the season is when that evil demon rears its ugly head. You see managers fall off and leave injured players in their lineup or don’t change out a player with a clear “bad matchup.” And that manager could be playing against a team you need to lose so you can make it into the playoffs. 

As commissioner, I’ve come up with a pretty good way to stop the apathy of out-of-contention owners.

McCoy yawn

Fantasy football playoffs end at the time the NFL Playoffs are beginning. I use that to my advantage.

At the conclusion of our fantasy season, each manager picks one of the 12 NFL Playoff teams. The manager who won the league gets to pick their NFL team first, the runner-up in our league picks second, and so on. So if your fantasy team is in the consolation playoffs, there is still incentive to win because picking what you feel is the seventh-best NFL team is a lot better than picking the twelfth-best. You don’t want to be stuck with the Vikings who just happen to limp into the Playoffs.

Once everyone has their horse, then you watch the NFL Playoffs to see where your horse finishes. When the first four teams in the NFL Playoffs are eliminated, the team that scored the fewest points is last—that person gets the last “choice” of next year’s fantasy football draft.

If the team you picked wins the Super Bowl, then you’re first at picking your fantasy football draft position, 1st through 12th, or anywhere in between.

So basically, you pick your NFL team based on how you finished in the league, and then you pick your fantasy football draft position based on how your NFL team finishes in the NFL Playoffs. With this system, we’ve eliminated “door mat” owners, as Rummy described them—there is always incentive to win.

Want to see what I can do with 140 characters? Follow Me on Twitter.

Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins Bio

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).

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Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).