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The Wire: Week 1—Geno Smith & Some Wideouts

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I discussed which running backs and tight ends to grab or avoid here. In this article, I’ll hit the wide receivers and a quarterback.

Andrew Hawkins

Hawkins is the younger, Blacker (and more sober) version of Wes Welker. And he’s going to produce just like Welker.

When you watch Hawkins play, you see that he has the same knack for finding the open spot on the field and is able to read defenders like Welker does. He’s also exceptionally quick and kinda fast.

He led the team in targets (10), receptions (8) and yards (87). Jordan Cameron left the game (shoulder) around the middle of the second half and had only 4 targets.

With the news that Josh Gordon is likely to return, people may be discounting Hawkins. Don’t. Gordon’s return, along with Cameron’s extended absence, only helps Hawkins.

Brian Hoyer will rely on Hawkins to move the chains no matter who else is lining up as a pass catcher. Defenders will double Gordon and leave Hawkins to zip past linebackers and rack up receptions. He’s a guy to own in all leagues.

Josh Gordon

If you’re just now getting hip to picking up Gordon, you haven’t been paying attention.

Let me just put it this way: If you’re No. 1 player sustained a concussion and the news was they didn’t know if he was going to miss a few weeks or he may be out for the season, would you immediately drop him? Of course not.

You’d wait it out and see what happens. That’s exactly what I’ve been insisting (practically begging) owners to do since July. Gordon’s drug test presented a number of claims he could’ve (and still might have to) made in a lawsuit against the NFL. That lawsuit would’ve been in the avenue for a temporary restraining order that would’ve allowed him to play just as Kevin and Pat Williams did for two season in the Star Caps case.

Nevertheless, it appears that Gordon may get an opportunity to play immediately with a revamped Substance Abuse Policy likely to be approved at any time.

If his suspension is lifted, then of course he should be the No. 1 waiver wire add this week. The crazy thing is owners are now going to drop that guy they spent a 13th- or 14th-round pick on to secure Gordon when they could’ve just spent the late-round pick in the first place. Hindsight, huh? Nah. I tried to provide foresight.

Either way, spend what you feel a top-3 wideout is worth to get Gordon.

 

Allen Hurns

Allen Hurns is a prime example of a guy owners will rush out to add who will probably disappoint in most weeks. Hurns will be added and dropped throughout the year depending on the weeks when he scores touchdowns.

In Week 1, it was as though he snuck in a couple of touchdowns and then the defense completely shut him down.

Hurns scored both of his touchdowns in the first quarter. He had three of his four receptions in the first quarter and his fourth and final reception at the 7:59 mark in the second quarter. He did get another catch afterwards.

Hurns will be fluky from week-to-week (especially when Cecil Shorts returns) and won't provide consistent fantasy production. Look elsewhere.

Malcom Floyd

I boomed out this tweet prior to the start of the first set of games on Sunday.

Screen Shot_2014-09-09_at_11.34.37_AM

Then I clicked “Tweet” again just before Monday Night Football:

Screen Shot_2014-09-09_at_11.36.12_AM

I wrote extensively about Floyd here. Floyd is everything Vincent Brown was not. Floyd is going to provide the Chargers with a adept red zone target and is masterful at stretching the field.

And if you watched the game last night, you saw how he came this close to catching a second 50+ yard touchdown.

Floyd will provide you with consistent WR2/3 numbers all season. You can expect him to average 70+ yards per game and have the opportunity to score in each game. He’s someone who you can add to your roster and then trade away a more well known “name brand” guy if you need help at another position.

Geno Smith

I didn’t care about Week 1 for Geno Smith with respect to fantasy purposes. He did okay, nothing remarkable.

The reason Smith didn’t put up a remarkable stat line is because the game plan didn’t call for it. He played against a subpar Oakland Raiders team that scored at the end of the first quarter and at the end of the fourth quarter. Other than that, the Jets pretty much played the type of game they wanted to play.

That won’t be the case for the next six weeks.

The Jets face the following quarterbacks in Weeks 2-7, respectively: Aaron Rodgers, Jay Cutler, Matthew Stafford, Phillip Rivers, Peyton Manning and Tom Brady.

It goes without saying (but I’m gonna say it anyway) that Smith will have to throw the rock significantly more in the coming weeks than the 28 times he did in Week 1.

Not only will Smith provide more opportunities through the air in the coming weeks, his ground game (10 rushes in Week 1) will supplement his fantasy value each week, as well. 

[All done. More on Twitter—Follow Me.]

Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins Bio

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).

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Cedric Hopkins

Cedric Hopkins runs this sports law/fantasy football blog. If you have issues with it, it's all his fault. Cedric was an athlete-student at the University of New Mexico (Basketball - Go Lobos!). He then morphed into a student-athlete when he attended law school in San Diego. Age replaced athleticism and now he writes appellate briefs for criminals (alleged criminals, of course) in state and federal cases, including writing U.S. Supreme Court briefs.

For years Cedric has researched and written about legal issues but maintained a love for sports. With FieldandCourt.com, he's combining his two passions: researching and writing about sports. When he's not in court arguing a case before a judge (or writing about himself in the third person), he'll be doing the same with his articles on FieldandCourt.com. Follow me, er, him on Twitter (opens in a new window).